Tag Archives: center for biological diversity

Mexican Wolf Numbers Increase for 5th Straight Year to 109 Wolves, 19 Packs

SILVER CITY, N.M.— For the fifth year in a row the number of endangered Mexican gray wolves has increased. There are now 109 individuals, including 53 in New Mexico and 56 in Arizona, compared to 83 a year ago, 80 in 2013, and 67 at the beginning of 2012. The number of breeding pairs also increased to 14, although only eight of these pairs met the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s definitional requirement of producing two pups that survive until the end of the year. Continue reading

Feds Propose Roadmap for Mexican Gray Wolf’s Future in Arizona, New Mexico

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service laid out its vision for the future of the endangered Mexican gray wolf today, proposing releases of captive-bred wolves into new areas of New Mexico and parts of Arizona and allowing wolves to roam from the Mexican border to Interstate 40, a much broader region than currently permitted. But the proposed rule broadens guidelines allowing ranchers and others to kill Mexican wolves, a persistent problem that has hindered the recovery of these important predators. Continue reading

Arizona Game and Fish Endorses Plan to Ramp Up Killing of Endangered Wolves

PHOENIX— The Arizona Game and Fish Commission unanimously endorsed a plan this week that will make it vastly easier to kill endangered Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico and arbitrarily caps the number of wolves in both states at 300, allowing for a number as low as 125. Significantly, the commission also recommends that management of wolves be taken away from the federal government, where it has been since passage of the federal Endangered Species Act, and given to the state, which has long been hostile to wolves. Continue reading

Rare Alaskan wolf being considered for addition to the ESA

Today, even while the US Fish & Wildlife Service is trying to delist wolves from endangered status in the Lower-48 states, the agency posted its decision that an Endangered Species Act (ESA)
listing “may be warranted” for a wolf subspecies that has never been protected — the Alexander Archipelago wolf. Continue reading

(PRESS RELEASE) Rare Alaskan Wolf Closer to Endangered Species Act Protection

ANCHORAGE, Alaska- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that Alaska’s Alexander Archipelago wolves may need protection under the Endangered Species Act because of unsustainable logging in the Tongass National Forest and elsewhere in southeast Alaska. The agency will now conduct an in-depth status review of this rare subspecies of gray wolf, which lives only in the region’s old-growth forests.  Continue reading

After Legal Challenge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Rescinds Permit to Trap Border-crossing Wolves in the Southwest

SILVER CITY, N.M.— Just two weeks after a legal challenge by the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has rescinded a permit it had granted itself and other federal and state agencies to trap wolves that cross into Arizona and New Mexico from Mexico. The contested “take permit” authorized wolves to be trapped and kept indefinitely in captivity, even though by law those wolves should be fully protected under the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading

Thousands Call for Investigation of Wildlife Services’ Killing of Mexican Wolf, Cover-up

SILVER CITY, N.M.— Fifteen thousand people from around the country are calling on Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack to investigate the apparent killing of a Mexican gray wolf by a Wildlife Services employee and the subsequent cover-up of the incident. Although the killing happened months ago in New Mexico, the public didn’t learn about it until it was reported by the Albuquerque Journal on April 4th. Wildlife Services, which is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has refused to publicly discuss the killing. Continue reading

Wildlife Services Agent Investigated in Illegal Shooting of Wolf in New Mexico

SILVER CITY, N.M.— A U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services employee who was working as part of an effort to recover the endangered Mexican gray wolf is being investigated in the unauthorized fatal shooting of a wolf. The incident reportedly happened on Jan. 19 but was not made public until today’s story by the Albuquerque Journal, which was spurred by a tip from the Center for Biological Diversity. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which had previously reported that “no wolf mortalities were documented” for the month of January, would not confirm the killing had taken place. Continue reading

Lawsuit Filed to Protect Border-crossing Wolves Entering Arizona, New Mexico From Government Traps

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit today challenging a permit issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that will allow federal and state agencies to capture wolves that enter Arizona and New Mexico from either the north or the south and keep them in captivity indefinitely. Mexico has an ongoing program to reintroduce endangered Mexican gray wolves in the Sierra Madre, and wolves from the northern Rockies could move into the Southwest at any time. Continue reading

As California Considers Bill to Ban Lead Hunting Ammunition, National Poll Finds Most Americans Support Switch to Nontoxic Bullets

SACRAMENTO— As the California legislature begins considering Assembly Member Anthony Rendon’s bill mandating use of nonlead ammunition for all hunting in California, a new national poll has found that 57 percent of Americans support requiring the use of nontoxic bullets for hunting. The poll, commissioned by the Center for Biological Diversity, also found that more Americans support a ban on lead ammunition than oppose it and that a majority of voters think Republicans in Congress should work with Democrats to ban lead in ammunition. Continue reading

Washington State Senate Passes Wolf-killing Bill

OLYMPIA, Wash.— Just as Washington’s wolf population is making a historic comeback, senators in the Washington legislature have passed one of several bills pending that aim to gut key portions of the state’s wolf conservation and management plan, expanding when and how wolves can be killed. Continue reading

Mexican Gray Wolf Numbers Increase for Third Year in a Row

SILVER CITY, N.M.— Pup births boosted the number of endangered Mexican gray wolves in the wild in the Southwest for the third year in a row, according to a new census conducted by federal, state and tribal agencies. The count of 75 wolves, including 38 in New Mexico and 37 in Arizona, compares to 58 a year ago and 50 at the beginning of 2011. However, the number of breeding pairs decreased from six in the last count to just three today. Continue reading

First New Mexican Gray Wolf Released into the Wild in 4 Years is Recaptured 3 Weeks Later

SILVER CITY, N.M.— A four-year stalemate in federal efforts to reintroduce Mexican gray wolves to the Southwest took another step backward last week when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recaptured a male wolf only three weeks after his release into the wild. Continue reading

Lawsuit Launched to Challenge Feds’ Capture of Endangered Wolves That Enter Arizona or New Mexico

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over the agency’s decision to grant itself a “recovery permit” to live-capture endangered wolves that may enter New Mexico and Arizona from Mexico or the Rocky Mountains. Mexico recently released nine Mexican gray wolves near the U.S. border in the Sierra Madre, and wolves from the northern Rocky Mountains could make their way south at any time. Continue reading

Lawsuit Filed to Protect Mexican Gray Wolf as Endangered Subspecies

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today over the agency’s rejection of a 2009 scientific petition from the Center that sought classification of the Mexican gray wolf as an endangered subspecies or population of gray wolves. Mexican wolves are currently protected as endangered along with all other wolves in the lower 48 states, with the exception of those in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Lakes region. In filing today’s suit, the Center said specific protection for Mexican wolves is needed to ensure their recovery. Continue reading

Lawsuit Filed to Speed Reintroduction of Endangered Mexican Gray Wolves to Wild in Arizona, New Mexico

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity filed suit today challenging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s failure to respond to the group’s 2004 petition calling for implementation of sweeping reforms in the management of the Mexican gray wolf population, which has grown by a scant three animals over the past eight years, leaving only 58 wolves in the wild today. Recommendations from a panel of scientists in 2001, which called for an immediate reduction in the number of Mexican gray wolves removed from the wild and an increase in the number released, have languished for 11 years even as the Service has repeatedly pledged to act on them. Continue reading