HOWL Colorado

Category Archives: In Court – Legal

Follow the progress of legal battles around the country to protect wolves.

Lawsuit Filed to Protect Border-crossing Wolves Entering Arizona, New Mexico From Government Traps

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit today challenging a permit issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that will allow federal and state agencies to capture wolves that enter Arizona and New Mexico from either the north or the south and keep them in captivity indefinitely. Mexico has an ongoing program to reintroduce endangered Mexican gray wolves in the Sierra Madre, and wolves from the northern Rockies could move into the Southwest at any time. Continue reading

Lawsuit Launched to Challenge Feds’ Capture of Endangered Wolves That Enter Arizona or New Mexico

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over the agency’s decision to grant itself a “recovery permit” to live-capture endangered wolves that may enter New Mexico and Arizona from Mexico or the Rocky Mountains. Mexico recently released nine Mexican gray wolves near the U.S. border in the Sierra Madre, and wolves from the northern Rocky Mountains could make their way south at any time. Continue reading

Lawsuit Filed to Protect Mexican Gray Wolf as Endangered Subspecies

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today over the agency’s rejection of a 2009 scientific petition from the Center that sought classification of the Mexican gray wolf as an endangered subspecies or population of gray wolves. Mexican wolves are currently protected as endangered along with all other wolves in the lower 48 states, with the exception of those in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Lakes region. In filing today’s suit, the Center said specific protection for Mexican wolves is needed to ensure their recovery. Continue reading

Lawsuit Filed to Speed Reintroduction of Endangered Mexican Gray Wolves to Wild in Arizona, New Mexico

SILVER CITY, N.M.— The Center for Biological Diversity filed suit today challenging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s failure to respond to the group’s 2004 petition calling for implementation of sweeping reforms in the management of the Mexican gray wolf population, which has grown by a scant three animals over the past eight years, leaving only 58 wolves in the wild today. Recommendations from a panel of scientists in 2001, which called for an immediate reduction in the number of Mexican gray wolves removed from the wild and an increase in the number released, have languished for 11 years even as the Service has repeatedly pledged to act on them. Continue reading

Expert: Impending wolf suit could stick

A threat to genetic diversity and legal precedent could undermine a decision to give Wyoming control of its wolf population, a Vermont Law School professor says.
As expected, on Monday environmental groups filed a notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for lifting wolf protections and opening the way for a hunt in Wyoming. Earthjustice, which has won a Wyoming wolf lawsuit in the past, remains dissatisfied with the Wyoming plan to manage wolves as predators in 85 percent of state when federal protections end Sept. 30.
The predator classification will allow anyone to kill wolves at any time by any means, no license required.
In a trophy-game area in northwest Wyoming, a hunt capped at 52 animals will begin Oct. 1.

A threat to genetic diversity and legal precedent could undermine a decision to give Wyoming control of its wolf population, a Vermont Law School professor says.

As expected, on Monday environmental groups filed a notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for lifting wolf protections and opening the way for a hunt in Wyoming. Earthjustice, which has won a Wyoming wolf lawsuit in the past, remains dissatisfied with the Wyoming plan to manage wolves as predators in 85 percent of state when federal protections end Sept. 30.

The predator classification will allow anyone to kill wolves at any time by any means, no license required.

In a trophy-game area in northwest Wyoming, a hunt capped at 52 animals will begin Oct. 1…

Read the entire article on jhnewsandguide.com: Expert: Impending wolf suit could stick

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