HOWL Colorado

Ranching vs. Wolves

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)’s recent decision to lift the federal regulation protecting wolves in Wyoming — and allow hunters and ranchers to shoot wolves on sight across 90 percent of the state — has reignited the decades-old conflict between wildlife conservation objectives and the ranching industry.

Native predator species, such as coyotes, bears, wolves and mountain lions, are critical to the functioning of ecosystems, helping to keep nature in balance. But as livestock farms and ranches have expanded, problems have often occurred where large predators come into direct contact with farmed animals, such as sheep and cattle. The FWS’s decision will allow anyone to shoot wolves on sight across most of Wyoming, although wolves will still remain off-limits inside the state’s national wildlife refuges and national parks, such as the Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and the Wind River Indian Reservation.

But therein lays the crux of the problem: Most people still see “conservation” and “ranching” as two very separate — and often incompatible — objectives. In the pursuit of maximizing food production, we have done our utmost to eradicate the threat posed by nature to modern farming systems. At the same time, growing recognition of the damage that human activity is inflicting on the environment has fueled campaigns to protect and conserve threatened species and wildlife habitats.

The political solution has always been to ring fence dedicated to “conservation areas,” which we then protect and do our best to conserve. But the problem is that nature sees no such boundaries and the result of this cognitive separation between modern food production and nature conservation is that conflict inevitably arises wherever “nature” and “ranch” subsequently meet…

Read the entire article on huffingtonpost.com: Ranching with wolves

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